1930 Bentley Speed Six Blue Train Special by Gurney Nutting

Woolf Barnato was the most prominent of the "Bentley Boys", a group of wealthy British car enthusiasts who in the 1920s made Bentley one of the most prominent names in racing. He bought the company in 1925, and during the period from 1927-1930, Bentley won Le Mans 4 times in a row. Woolf himself drove the winning car in 1928-1930, and remains the only Le Mans driver with a perfect wins-to-starts record.

One of Woolf's most prominent exploits was the Blue Train race, where he claimed that he could beat the Blue Train from Cannes to Calais. He was so far ahead of the train that he continued onto London, crossing the English Channel in a packet steamer, and parking his Speed Six outside the Convervative Club on St. James Street only 4 minutes ahead of the time that the Blue Train arrived at the station in Calais. Though he won a £200 in a bet that he could do it, he was also fined £160 by the French Motor Manufacturer's Association for racing on public roads.

The car pictured here is not the one that raced, but a sleeker design from Gurney Nutting that Woolf himself took delivery of two months later, and dubbed the "Blue Train Special." It was long mistaken to be the car that Barnato drove, and has forever been associated with his achievement.

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Details

Interior

Specifications

Price Production Weight
-- -- --
Engine Aspiration Torque
6.6 liter inline-6 2 SU Carburetors --
Power Power/Volume Power/Weight
180 HP @ 3500 rpm 27.3 HP/Liter --
Top Speed 0-62 mph Range
-- -- --
Price Production Weight Engine Aspiration Torque
-- -- -- 6.6 liter inline-6 2 SU Carburetors --
Power Power/Volume Power/Weight Range 0-62 mph Top Speed
180 HP @ 3500 rpm 27.3 HP/Liter -- -- -- --
Imperial Metric